Ebola outbreak: Congo showed transfusion therapy can work – but scientists don’t know why

img, .hide-comment-buttons #singleCommentHeader .formContainer >.title, .hide-comment-buttons #loginButtonContainer display: none; /* Expandable MPU fix */ #side .x300 overflow: visible!important; /* Collapsing Skyscraper fix */ .ad div.skyscraper height:auto!important;padding:0px!important; .ad div#mpu.skyscraper height:600px!important; Ebola outbreak: Congo showed transfusion therapy can work, but scientists don’t know why – Health News – Health & Families – The Independent Monday 05 January 2015

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Dry January Katie Hopkins Homeless Veterans Campaign George Osborne Greece Michael Gove Life >Health & Families >Health News Ebola outbreak: Congo showed transfusion therapy can work, but scientists don’t know why The best treatment available is still surrounded by uncertainty
Steve Connor Steve Connor Steve Connor is the Science Editor of The Independent. He has won many awards for his journalism, including five-times winner of the prestigious British science writers’ award; the David Perlman Award of the American Geophysical Union; twice commended as specialist journalist of the year in the UK Press Awards; UK health journalist of the year and a special merit award of the European School of Oncology for his investigative journalism. He has a degree in zoology from the University of Oxford and has a special interest in genetics and medical science, human evolution and origins, climate change and the environment.
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Sunday 04 January 2015
Print Your friend’s email address Your email address Note: We do not store your email address(es) but your IP address will be logged to prevent abuse of this feature. Please read our Legal Terms & Policies A A A Email The experimental transfusion treatment that now forms the best of a limited pool of options for any doctors treating Ebola patients was first used during the Kikwit outbreak in 1995 in Zaire – now the Democratic Republic of Congo.
Called passive immunotherapy, it takes antibodies circulating in the blood of Ebola patients who have survived the disease and injects them into patients showing symptoms of the infection. The hope is that the